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Blindside Artist Run Space, Melbourne Australia 2006.

Publications

Interview, "Artistic Machinima and Britney Spear's Pink Mansion" by Mathias Jansson, Art21, 2012.

At the end of the first decade of the twenty–first century, contemporary culture appears increasingly seduced and absorbed by apocalyptic reveries. Scientists are racing to cryo-preserve genetic material from animals and plant matter in underground bunkers, while filmmakers use the spectacle of computer-generated imagery (CGI) to speculate on the outcomes from dramatic climate change, that we are not yet...Download Interview » Or read the article online here»

Eyeline Contemporary Visual Arts Essay, Confronting Consensus: The Art and Politics of Christopher Howlett written by Mark Webb and Mark Pennings, Issue 76, p.38-47, 2012.

The restless Chris Howlett uses his art to energetically pursue a wide range of conceptually and politically focused projects in divergent mediums. He is in fact an exemplary multi-tasker in a post-medium world and has essayed everything from installation, to performance, to sound art, to digital modding with a Quixotic willingness to engage with big themes and issues that would daunt many artists....Download » Or read the article online here»

Catalogue Essay, Chris Howlett: In the not-too-distant future by José Da Silva, Premier's New Media Art Prize, Gallery of Modern Art, 2010.

At the end of the first decade of the twenty–first century, contemporary culture appears increasingly seduced and absorbed by apocalyptic reveries. Scientists are racing to cryo-preserve genetic material from animals and plant matter in underground bunkers, while filmmakers use the spectacle of computer-generated imagery (CGI) to speculate on the outcomes from dramatic climate change, that we are not yet...Download » Or read the article online here»

Catalogue Essay, Vocal Thoughts by Peter McKay, Contemporary Art Centre of SA Inc., Adelaide, South Australia, 2010.

CACSA Projects 2010 #9 presents Vocal Thoughts curated by Peter McKay was an exhibition that focused on various forms of mental unrest, bringing to the fore exchanges that are largely left unspoken, or sometimes engaged with a closed mind. Blurring the line between public and private, internal dialogue and social exchange, this exhibition provides an opportunity to form a more intimate...Download » Or read the article online here»

Review, Realtime magazine #100, Dec 2010, Intimate Warnings - Chris Reid: vocal thoughts CACSA - Group show curated by Peter McKay..

The insightfully curated and compelling exhibition brings together several artists whose work explores our sometimes desperate need to express unhappy thoughts and talk to someone. Taken together, the works examine significant issues in mental health and personal relations in a complex, electronically mediated world...Download »

Review, Flashbacks by Mark Pennings, Eyeline: Contemporary Visual Arts Number 70, p.83, Brisbane, Australia, 2009.

In Flashbacks, his recent two-part exhibition at the Brisbane City Hall and !Metro Arts, the energetic Chris Howlett attempted to portray the zeitgeist of our manipulated digital social reality and the ambiguous social identities it engenders...Download »

Article, Work Benefits by Serena Bently Art Market Report, June 2010.

In February this year, a nmumber of artists were forcibly evicted from their studios in Beijing's renowed art district, Factory 798. Emblematic of China'a relentless economic development, the studios are being destroyed to make way for hig-end shops, cafes and commercial galleries. The demolition..Download »

Catalogue Essay by Mark Web, Flashbacks, !MetroArts | Balmoral Room, Brisbane Australia, 2009.

In this instalment of Flashbacks, Chris Howlett continues to examine the way in which meaning is derived from a multiplicity of places, spaces and texts. By making apparent how these complex discursive practices complicate what is meaningful and meaningless, he wants to make us aware of how these often-arbitrary judgments shape the particular ideological spaces we find ourselves in. With this body of work, Howlett wants to...Download » Or read the article online here»

Catalogue Essay by Chris Handran, Weapons on the Wall, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane Australia, 2005.

The title of Chris Howlett’s ongoing series of exhibitions comes from the description of World War II propaganda posters as ‘Weapons on the Wall’3. This phrase indicates the extent to which such wars are not just about fighting the enemy, but also about waging a war for people’s hearts and minds. Support for a cause cannot be assumed, but must be won through reason....Download » Or read the article online here»